s2p

Agenda

Day 1 - Thursday, September 29
TimeDescription
4:00 – 6:00pmRegistration
6:00 – 7:00pmNetworking Reception
7:00 – 8:30pmWelcome and Framing the Issues Conversation
Day 2 - Friday, September 30
TimeDescription
7:00 – 8:15amContinental Breakfast
8:15 – 8:30amWelcome
8:30 – 9:30amPanel Discussion - Data and Discipline: What the Numbers Tell Us about Disparities in Race and Gender
9:35 – 11:05amPlenary Session - Alternatives to Punitive Disciplinary Practices
11:05 – 11:15amBreak
11:15 – 12:30pmBreakout sessions
  • Using Data to Present a Compelling Story
  • Know Your Rights, Not Just the Rules: Understanding and Reforming Discipline Policies
  • Gender, Race and Justice: Cultural Competencies from the Principal’s Office to the Classroom
  • Dual Disparities: Special Education and Discipline
12:30 – 2:00pmLunch and Panel Discussion - It Takes a Village to Dismantle the Pipeline: Multiple Stakeholders, Multiple Voices
2:15 – 3:30pmBreakout sessions
  • The Nuts and Bolts of Filing Administrative Complaints: Challenging Disparities in Discipline
  • Using Data to Present a Compelling Story
  • Know Your Rights, Not Just the Rules: Understanding and Reforming Discipline Policies
  • Gender, Race and Justice: Cultural Competencies from the Principal’s Office to the Classroom
3:40 – 4:40pmPanel Discussion - From the Classroom to the Courtroom: Breaking the Continuum
4:45pmWrap – Up /Reflection
5:00pmDinner on your own
Day 3 - Saturday, October 1
TimeDescription
8:00 – 9:00amContinental Breakfast
9:00 – 10:00amPanel Discussion - The Fight for Justice: Advocacy and Discipline
10:05 – 11:20amBreakout Sessions
  • The Nuts and Bolts of Filing Administrative Complaints: Challenging Disparities in Discipline
  • Gender, Race and Justice: Cultural Competencies from the Principal’s Office to the Classroom
  • Time Out Versus Locked Out: Alternative Disciplinary Placements, Programs and Schools
11:25 – 12:30pmDiscussion - Where Do We Go from Here: Implications for Advocacy, Policy and Practice
12:30pmEvaluation and Closing

Sessions

Reception and Opening Conversation: Framing the Issues

Join us as we open this multi-stakeholder convening to address issues surrounding race, gender and discipline. This opening conversation will take place in a town hall format and set the stage for our work in the days that follow -- first by exploring the historical and current frameworks that underscore the challenges and opportunities that we will discuss during the conference, and second by considering why this work is imperative to ensuring student achievement among children of color who are underserved by our nation’s schools.

Data and Discipline: What the Numbers Tell Us about Disparities in Race and Gender

This session will provide the backdrop for what is happening at the national, state and local levels, by examining quantitative and qualitative data and what it tells us about school discipline. Panelists will discuss the impact that in-school-suspension, out-of-school suspension, expulsion and other discipline practices have on students. In addition, the session will highlight rates of alternative placements and referrals to the juvenile justice and criminal systems.

Alternatives to Punitive Disciplinary Practices

This session will explore nationally recognized programs, models and practices that are being implemented in schools across the country in an effort to increase student achievement and decrease the use of harsh and overly punitive discipline practices. Panelists will discuss implementation of these methods and models such as Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, Restorative Justice, and Response to Intervention. Presenters and participants will also engage in small group dialogue to consider why and how these practices can be effective and what conditions lead to successful implementation.

From the Classroom to the Courtroom: Breaking the Continuum

This discussion will delve into what happens to students who are subjected to punitive disciplinary practices that push them out of classrooms and schools, by taking a closer look at the intersection of the education and juvenile and criminal justice systems. We will discuss the discretion that school educators and administrators have when referring students, the role of advocates in supporting students and the role of judges in breaking the continuum.

The Fight for Justice: Advocacy and Discipline

This discussion will focus on addressing the issues highlighted throughout the convening which demand eradicating overly punitive disciplinary measures and often require multiple strategies and solutions. Recent advocacy around discipline issues throughout the country will be highlighted, along with the efficacy of various tools that have been or may be used in efforts to eliminate racial and gender disparities and curb push out in schools nationwide. Advocates will shed light on the challenges we may face along the way and the strategies we can use to overcome them.

The Nuts and Bolts of Filing of Administrative Complaints: Challenging Disparities in Discipline

During this session we will learn about the process for filing an administrative complaint. Presenters will discuss what causes an individual or group to file a complaint, the data and information needed to support a complaint, and with whom or what agencies a complaint may be filed. We will consider what may happen after a complaint is filed – from submission through resolution.

Know Your Rights, Not Just the Rules: Understanding and Reforming Discipline Policies

This will be an in-depth exploration of due process, which will include the rights of students and parents. Presenters will also explore the contents of discipline policies, consider what makes them effective, and discuss potential ways to challenge unsound policies.

Dual Disparities: Special Education and Discipline

Students with special needs are often disciplined at rates higher than their peers. We will discuss the protections in place to ensure that the rights of students with disabilities are not violated, including the steps that must be taken when they are disciplined and subjected to in-school suspension, out-of-school suspension, and alternative settings.

Time Out Versus Locked Out: Alternative Disciplinary Placements, Programs and Schools

During this session we will take an in-depth look at alternative programs, schools, and placements and the challenges that have been brought against them. We will discuss their purpose -- with a focus on which students end up in alternative settings, and what factors contribute to a successful or unsuccessful program, school, or placement.

Using Data to Present a Compelling Story

The public has a right to access certain types of data. This workshop will focus on the use of data and other public information that are collected by schools, school districts, states and the federal government. We will explore how data, when interpreted accurately, can be presented in various formats and used to tell a compelling story.

Gender, Race and Justice: Cultural Competencies from the Principal’s Office to the Classroom

A major focus of this convening is to highlight the disparities in discipline data and practices by student race and gender. During this session we will take an in-depth look at the importance of cultural competence in the classroom and among school and district administration. We will also consider the impact that it has on student learning, and identify and set forth culturally-relevant practices aimed at increasing achievement for boys and girls of all races. 


Luncheon Panel: It takes a Village to Dismantle the Pipeline: Multiple stakeholders, Multiple Voices

This will be a facilitated discussion focused on eliminating the punitive disciplinary practices that disproportionately affect students of color and negatively impact their academic success. A panel of stakeholders will highlight the issues and problem through their eyes and identify the causes, the impact on our communities, the role they have played in combating the problem, the tools that they have used to address the problem, and the results of their efforts.

Final Discussion

Where Do We Go From Here: Implications for Advocacy, Policy and Practice

We will explore how advocates can build on the substance of their work and increase multi-stakeholder support. 

Speakers and Presenters Include:

Honorable James F. Bass, Jr., Chatham County Superior Court

Shakti Belway, Southern Poverty Law Center

Jonathan Brice, Baltimore City Public Schools

Honorable LeRoy Burke III, Chatham County Juvenile Court

Omisade Burney-Scott, YWCA Greater Triangle

Gwen Cartledge, Ohio State University

Maisie Chin, Community Asset Development Re-defining Education (CADRE)

Manuel Criollo, The Labor/Community Strategy Center

Evelyn Dandy, Retired Professor, Armstrong Atlantic State University

Daniel Dodd-Ramirez, Step Up Savannah

Jennifer Falk, Parent to Parent of Georgia / NAACP State Conference / Gwinett STOPP

Ira Foster, Georgia Legal Services Program

Jim Freeman, Advancement Project

Fatima Goss Graves, National Women’s Law Center

Richard Gray, Jr., Annenberg Institute for School Reform

Diane Jackson, Young Men of Honor

John Jackson, Schott Foundation for Public Education

Honorable Otis S. Johnson, City of Savannah

Avis Jones-DeWeever, National Council of Negro Women

Harold Jordan, ACLU of Pennsylvania

Jason Langberg, Advocates for Children’s Services

Tim Leibham, Eau Claire Area School District

Dan Losen, The Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at UCLA

Julie Mead, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Becky Milton, Parent to Parent of Georgia

Damekia Morgan, Families and Friends of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children (FFLIC)

Dennis Parker, ACLU Racial Justice Program

Art Rainwater, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Rob Rhodes, Director of Legal Affairs, Georgia Appleseed

Warren Simmons, Annenberg Institute for School Reform

Kent Smith, Eau Claire Area School District / WI PBIS Network

Stacey Suber-Drake, Georgia Department of Education

Marlyn Tilman, Gwinnett STOPP

Michael Thompson, Council of State Governments Justice Center

Joseph Tulman, UDC Law School, Took Crowell Institute for At-Risk Youth

Darren Woodruff, National Center on Response to Intervention